<![CDATA[Wrestling Moves - Blog]]>Mon, 01 Feb 2016 01:41:46 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[2010 Washington State Coaches Clinic with Cary Kolat]]>Tue, 29 Dec 2015 23:52:56 GMThttp://www.kolat.com/blog/2010-washington-state-coaches-clinic-with-cary-kolatWashington State Coaches Clinic
 October 30, 2010
 Guest Clinician Cary Kolat

Link to all clips from the clinic (click here)

 
Fundamental Takedowns:  covering the solid attacks on your feet that all team members need to have a full understanding of.
 
High Crotch:  elbow deep
  1. Solid head, shoulder, and hip position
  2. Angle & Penetration on a High Crotch
  3. Transferring the Hands on a High Crotch
  4. Penetration Step and Drill for Power and Flexibility
  5. Elbow is Blocked on High Crotch Lift
  6. Cary Talks About the Everyday Drill Habit
  7. A Real High Crotch with Inside Knee Focus
  8. Opponent Sprawls on High Crotch Elbow Deep Finish
  9. Tall Man Wins Drill
Crackdown:  don’t make it harder than what it is, focus on the set & control position
  1. Crackdown Positioning on the High Crotch
  2. First Place to go on Crackdown
  3. Using the Knee to Get in on Crackdown
  4. Foot hook to Finish Crackdown
  5. Jack Jensen Crackdown Finish to Cradle
Double:  best shot in the world, drilled & perfected on a regular basis, elbow deep
  1. Building Up on a Double Leg
  2. Elbow Deep on fundamental Shots
  3. Basic Double Leg Finish From Level Change
  4. Capturing Hand Control From a Double Leg and Drilling
  5. Drilling the Build Up on the Double Leg
  6. Reset the Double Leg When Up in Bad Position
Single Leg:  elbow deep, drilling should focus on the corner
  1. Hitting the Step on a Single Leg Sweep to Avoid Hips
  2. Picking Up a Single Leg by Transferring Weight
  3. Putting the Weight to the Hands on Single Leg
  4. Building Up on a Single Leg When Opponent Sprawls
  5. Building Up on a Single Leg to Double Leg Finish
  6. Opponent Puts Knee to Mat with Wizzer use Knee to Finish
  7. Opponent Puts Knee to Mat Tripod to Ankle Finish
  8. Going to Back to Catch Ankle to Finish Single Leg
 
Talking Point:  Cary Talks About Stretching During Practice

Putting all shots together when facing the sprawl:  very important that all drill sessions give athletes a true look at the best competition and how they react.  Drilling on feet should always include my opponents defense!
 
Rebuild Drill:  used for conditioning, warm-up or end of practice, key point is motion does not stop until finish, partner needs to float.
 
Rebuild Double:
  1. Rebuild Drill From Double Leg
Rebuild Single Leg:
  1. Rebuild Drill Single Leg
Rebuild High Crotch:
  1. Rebuild Drill High Crotch
Drilling the Flurry:
  1. Flurry Drill on Feet Fundamentals
  2. Flurry Drill Tied with a Finished Shot

Talking Point:  Keeping the Tempo of the Room Up with Drill

Peek-Out:  great technique and skill that should be utilized when drilling build ups on fundamental attacks.
 
Peek-Out:
  1. Peek Out Drill with Fundamental Shots
  2. Peek Out From Missed Single Leg
  3. Peek Out to all Three Shots
  4. Peek Out Conditioning Drill
 
Talking Point:  Cary Talks Percentages in Practice When Drilling

Set-Ups:  Create a master list of set-ups that tie to fundamental takedowns that are drilled consistently.  Also, plan training sessions that focus on specific set-ups during a training session.
  1. Level Change Set-Up to Shots
  2. Cary Explains Teaching the Penetration Step
  3. How You Really Use a Collar Tie
  4. Arm Post Set-Up
  5. Collar Tie Arm Post Set-Up Together
  6. Touch and Go Set-Up
  7. Elbow Pass Set-Up
  8. Elbow Pass Set-Up to Fundamental Shots
  9. Elbow Pass Set-Up to Fireman's Carry
  10. Elbow Pass Set-Up to Ankle Pick
  11. Busy Hands Set-Up to Fundamental Shots
  12. Miss Shot Set-Up How to Teach it
  13. Underhook
    1. Underhook Set-Up Bringing the Head Down
    2. Underhook Set-Up to Fundamental Attacks
    3. Underhook Set-Up Duckunder & Fireman's Carry
    4. Underhook Set-Up to Hip Toss
    5. Arm Drag From Underhook

Defense:  always overlooked during training, a good defense will break most opponents, defense earns points late in matches.  Mark Schultz, “Offense will get you there but defense wins championships!”
 
Head, Hands, & Hips:
  1. Cary Talks First Line of Defense Head
  2. Cary Talks Second Line of Defense Hands
  3. Cary Talks Last Line of Defense Hips
 
Defending Double Leg: 
  1. Spinning Against a Double Leg 
  2. Defending Double Leg When Put to Your Butt

Defending Single Leg:
  1. Breaking the Lock on a Single Leg
  2. Defending Single Leg Standing Drill
  3. Defending Single Leg Standing Shoulder Under the Chin
  4. Changing Opponent From High Crotch to Single Standing
  5. Getting Opponent Back to Mat When Defending Single Leg

High Crotch hardest to defend
  1. Putting Opponent on Hip From High Crotch
  2. Switching in on High Crotch From the Mat
  3. Switching in on High Crotch From Standing
  4. Rolling the Head Inside to Defend a High Crotch
  5. Putting Opponent below Knee When He Attempts Crackdown

 
Funk:  John Smith brought in the low single now coaches face using the funk & countering it.
  1. Using the Funk as a defense to Shots

Funk Counter Drill:  no doubt that every practice room should keep your team honest from sloppy drilling, partner should always make his teammate stay honest on all fundamental finishes.
  1. Hiding Feet on Fundamental Shots to Defend Funk
  2. Releasing the Leg When Opponent Funks
  3. Opponent hits Funk Go To Re-Funk
 
Counter Offense Scoring:  should be tied right into a defense day capitalizing on opponents mistakes.  Have primary techniques that are drilled off of opponents fundamental attacks.
  1. Down Block and Spin Against Opponents Shot
  2. Setting Up the Re-Shot 
 
Top:  Everyone over time develops an area or a set of turns, set technique agendas that cater to all athletes and expose them to all possibilities but keep in mind that most athletes ride a certain way and only looks for comfort zones when on top
 
Riding Skills:  warm-up or conditioning can include important skills such as this
  1. Breakdown Drill
  2. Basic Riding Skill Drill
  3. Releasing the Hips When Opponent Hits Granby
  4. Returning Opponent to the Mat When He Stands

Cradles:  long lanky guys will find cradles from all positions, when teaching be sure to check your shorter wrestlers position and put him into places that make sense for his reach, when drilling cradles the mind set should be look from all areas and throw them
  1. Getting to a Cross Face Cradle From Arm on the Back
  2. Arm on Back Nearside Cradle

Arm Bar/Half Neslon:
  1. How to Get the Arm to the Back for Bars
  2. Arm on the Back Claw Tilt
  3. Running the Bar Using Both Hands for the Set
  4. Arm on Back Bar and Half Finish

Bottom:  hips are everything when getting off the bottom, hip heist perfections is real key to getting out, heist should be used in a variety of drills to consistently perfect team performance in the bottom position
 
Hip Heist:  if they can do a sit-out they can do a hip heist
  1. Key Points to Teaching the Hip Heist
  2. Explaining the Key Points of Drilling the Heist
  3. Breaking the Lock in the Standing Positions
  4. Using a Low Level Cut to Clear Heist From Standing
  5. Hip Heist Drill of Opponents Back
  6. Hip Heist Drill From Holding Opponents Head

Holding Base Drill:  if they can’t stay in a base they can’t get out
  1. Wide base pyramid form (elbows out, knees out, fight pressure)
  2. Wide base hold drill
  3. Forcing opponent to take inside wrist to heist
  4. Forcing opponent to take ankle capture heist
  5. Forcing opponent to take spiral inside leg stand-up or heist
Beating a Tight Waist Ride:
  1. Goal of heavy hip trap opponent
  2. Drill without partner
  3. Drill with partner
  4. Inside leg up to heist
Clearing Ride Drills:  use during warm-up or conditioning
  1. On stomach drill clear 2 on 1 build
  2. On knees clear 2 on 1
  3. Clearing claw ride
  4. Clearing ankle ride
  5. Clearing foot hook ride
  6. Stomach no legs in drill
  7. Clearing leg on the way in
  8. Clearing leg on the mat going forward toe away
 
Coaching Tips/Points/Technology
 
Warm-Up:
  • Use this time to enforce skills you think are important to your teams success
  • This sets the tone of the training session keep it fresh
  • Be organized develop 20 warm-up routines
  • Allow captains to lead
Captains/Micro Manage:
  • Your job is to lead and create leaders allow them to own the team
  • Navy Seal Motto:  “Ready to Lead, Ready to Follow, Never Quit”
    • A team bonding experience, suffer together, get out together, win together, lose together
  • Lead too much and lose them
  • Your not becoming a captain your getting a job
  • Training partner group
    • Self discipline & accountable to team members
    • Quicker organization of partners during practice
What Is Your Style:
  • Best teams have a style don’t kid yourself
  • Everyone needs to be going in the same direction
  • Add O.Y.O. sessions for the individual or staff caters 1 on 1​
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<![CDATA[​We Compete too Soon]]>Thu, 15 Oct 2015 20:52:09 GMThttp://www.kolat.com/blog/we-compete-to-soon​Kids burning out in the sport of wrestling has been a debate since before kids even began specializing.  To steal a line from my favorite TV show S.O.A. (Son's of Anarchy), "What's the End Game?"  

To be brief lets say the end game is the World or Olympic stage.  This easily could be pages of debate and I expect I will probably receive comments asking questions but competing too soon is the number one problem in my opinion.

Simply put if you start wrestling at 5 years old and have much success the odds are you won't make it to college level wrestling.  Forget about the world stage because you probably won't be around.  Pretty much every athlete is dealing with different types of outside and internal pressure when competing.  Those pressures come in the form of other athletes catching up, family pressure, making weight, balancing school, and I can go on.

How long before that wrestler says to himself, "this is just not fun to me any longer?"  If you start early then dealing with this pressure naturally begins.  Those 5 year old wrestlers by the time they graduate high school have been dealing with it for approximately 15 years.

College begins another level of competing and a whole new level of pressure, the athletes you face are just better.  Nothing will ever be easy again at that level, and many just say I'm done leaving the sport.

Those who start in 7th, 8th, even 9th grade are just starting to get competitive and still have a love for wrestling.  They are less likely to fizzle out because they have not dealt with the outside and internal influences as long as the 5 year old still trying to keep going.  They have the greatest chance of reaching the top level of our sport.

Little kid titles are good for a short confidence boost but that is about all it's worth.  Find the boost from other places before putting him in a singlet thinking that is the answer.  Wrestling is so different than other sports it's fun, but at the same time not fun if another human being is dominating you.

There are rule breakers to every theory and some will start at 5 and be successful but you can't use them as a guide.  I see all these rankings for kids at age 8 nationally and I shake my head because 95% of them will not make it past high school.

Always open to discussion!]]>
<![CDATA[The G.O.A.T. of High School Wrestling]]>Wed, 14 Oct 2015 17:55:05 GMThttp://www.kolat.com/blog/the-goat-of-high-school-wrestlingFirst, I’m not a sports fan so I never knew all the terms that fans used when discussing sports.  I consistently saw this term used when comparing LeBron to Jordan and finally I had to ask my wife (she is the sports fan) , “What the hell does G.O.A.T. stand for?”
 
Now that I’m educated on the definition I can say this, “I’m not the G.O.A.T. of high school wrestling.”  Nice to be in the discussion but I don’t view myself as that guy.

Below is the guy that inspired me to climb the ranks early, plain and simple!  Making the Olympic team at 16 is a feat that has not been duplicated nor has anyone actually come close to it since 1973.

On top of making the team in 1973 Jimmy won the Midlands his Jr. year of high school when it was by far the toughest tournament in the United States (mix of the best Sr. level and college athletes).  What Jimmy Carr accomplished is sadly overlooked because I believe people had expectations of what was to come from him in college and beyond.

He passed away not that long ago due to a car accident and medical complications.

For those like me who don't know what G.O.A.T. means:  Greatest Of All Time
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<![CDATA[Critique of the Week 11/03/09]]>Sun, 15 Feb 2015 01:59:53 GMThttp://www.kolat.com/blog/critique-of-the-week-110309[embed=videolink]{"video":"http://youtu.be/K4H7WHZR2dA","width":"400","height":"300"}[/embed]

The following Critique of the Week was of the wrestler wearing BLACK:

Feet:

1.  Great shot off the whistle just wanted to highlight that this scoring opportunity presents itself usually once a match at the youth level.  The best time I feel to hit this type of shot is anytime during the second or third period after going out of bounds, or any time there is a stoppage of the match and both wrestlers come back to the centerline.  Wrestlers will tend to get lazy on the whistle so it’s important to always try and slip and easy scoring takedown in there.

Top:

2.    Focus on killing your opponent’s base before running arm bars.  Attempting the arm bar to early will only help take pressure off the bottom opponent.  Please see following videos inside library:  breakdown drill and weight on and circle drill

3.  When looking at the freeze frame your opponent is fighting that arm bar to the extent he is now wide open for the half on the other side.  When you make the change it’s hard and fast with the key being getting your chest in position to help you finish the half.  Please see following videos inside of library:  breakdown to arm bar half turn

Bottom:

1.  Focus on not leaving your hand on the mat when hitting a switch this leaves you open for an arm bar. Please see following videos inside of library: clearing hand and inside leg (danger of not clearing hand) & exploding switch

KOLAT.COM Critique of the Week™ Video

Critique of the Week is a service provided to users of KOLAT.COM.  If you are looking to have your wrestling analyzed by Cary to identify specific problems, areas that need work, or general analysis KOLAT.COM is here to help.

The Critique of the Week video on KOLAT.COM will appear on the homepage as well as in our blog where written evaluation with detailed comments will provide links to techniques and drills in the KOLAT.COM video library aimed at improving on problem areas identified in the video.

To submit a video for Critique of the Week Video™ please follow the guidelines below:

    * Must be a registered user on KOLAT.COM.

    * Upload your video to YouTube in high quality format (videos that are not clear will not be evaluated)

    * Send a YouTube link to kolat@kolat.com with your user name and indentify the wrestler you wish to be critiqued, the age group and hometown.

**We have many requests for this service so there is no guarantee that your video will be selected.  We select and analyze videos which will deliver the maximum benefit & learning experience for the individual as well as all our KOLAT.COM members.

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<![CDATA[Critique of the Week 11/11/09]]>Sun, 15 Feb 2015 01:58:46 GMThttp://www.kolat.com/blog/critique-of-the-week-111109The following Critique of the Week was of a New Jersey wrestler wearing the singlet with lettering on the front of his singlet:

[embed=videolink]{"video":"http://youtu.be/7fWKgkINcTM","width":"400","height":"300"}[/embed]

Feet:

1.  Your opponent was able to shuck or throw you by because you are leaning and heavy with your left hand or collar tie hand.  Always attempt to move your opponent with a collar tie not simply hold the head.  Please see following videos inside library: Offensive Tie-Up Positions/Controlling Ties

2.    You need to close the distance when attempting to capture a Russian tie along with keeping your head looking at your opponent and not down.  Please see following videos inside library: capturing Russian 2 on 1 from collar tie

3.  Always attempt to stay below your opponent’s hips when finishing basic shots especially on the single leg takedown.  Please see following videos inside of library: Shoulder roll attack below hips and Defending Single Leg Attack on Mat

KOLAT.COM Critique of the Week™ Video

Critique of the Week is a service provided to users of KOLAT.COM.  If you are looking to have your wrestling analyzed by Cary to identify specific problems, areas that need work, or general analysis KOLAT.COM is here to help.

The Critique of the Week video on KOLAT.COM will appear on the homepage as well as in our blog where written evaluation with detailed comments will provide links to techniques and drills in the KOLAT.COM video library aimed at improving on problem areas identified in the video.

To submit a video for Critique of the Week Video™ please follow the guidelines below:

    * Must be a registered user on KOLAT.COM.

    * Upload your video to YouTube in high quality format (videos that are not clear will not be evaluated)

    * Send a YouTube link to kolat@kolat.com with your user name and indentify the wrestler you wish to be critiqued, the age group and hometown.

**We have many requests for this service so there is no guarantee that your video will be selected.  We select and analyze videos which will deliver the maximum benefit & learning experience for the individual as well as all our KOLAT.COM members.

KOLAT.COM Your 24/7 Wrestling Coach

Learn it Fast and Learn it Smart at KOLAT.COM

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